Learn Japanese – Japanese Words http://www.japanesewords.net From Japanese Words to Japanese Fluency Wed, 23 Jan 2013 03:33:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.10 Japanese Tea Ceremony in Nagano http://www.japanesewords.net/1222/japanese-tea-ceremony-in-nagano/ Wed, 23 Jan 2013 03:32:02 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=1222

I hope you all had a great New Years. I spent mine in Nagano. It was very cold, but it was also very beautiful. It snowed the first night I was there and reached below 0 degrees Celsius every night. The last day we were there we visited my Aunt in law who teaches tea ceremony. We actually went there to eat Sukiyaki, but she also made us tea.

I recorded the entire thing and made a video. I hope you enjoy it. Japanese tea ceremony is very unique and each movement  has a meaning. The room itself is designed in the traditional style and has a very old feeling to it.

Please leave any questions below and I will do my best to answer them.

]]>
Remembering the Kanji Update http://www.japanesewords.net/1219/remembering-the-kanji-update/ Thu, 20 Dec 2012 13:14:34 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=1219 Last month I created a post about my goal to learn all 2042 kanji in the book Remembering the Kanji. I set a goal of December 31 as my finish date. With only two months to finish, I had to learn about 35-40 Kanji a day in order to make the deadline. With only 12 days to go will I finish in time?

The simple answer is no. I currently sit at about 1300 kanji and will have learned about 1500-1600 by the end of December. Unfortunately, there were days I wasn’t able to study and that put me behind schedule. Am I disappointed? Definitely not. In fact, I think this is a great example of why setting big goals and falling short can be a lot better than setting small goals and achieving them.

Learning 35-40 Kanji a day is a huge task. Instead, let’s say that I had been more reasonable and tried to learn 5 or 10 kanji a day. Still a formidable project. Even if I had succeeded I would only have learned 300-600 kanji. Not to mention that 10 kanji a day would take 200 days, and 5 a day would take over a year. I would be much more likely to give up.

Being at 1300 kanji, and knowing that I am over halfway there is a great feeling. It gives me the motivation I need to keep going. I’m nearly 70% there. Had I done 10 a day I would only be about 25% of the way.

Set goals that you have to strive for and try your best to accomplish them. In the end, even if you don’t achieve them you will be much further along than if you had chosen a much easier goal.

Here are some things for you to try. Just fill in the blank with a number that seems too much and try to accomplish it.

Study ________ new Japanese words a day.

Watch _______ hours of Japanese TV/Movies a day.

Speak to a native Japanese speaker _________ hour every day.

Learn _________ new Japanese phrases every day for 10 days.

]]>
Japanese Words for School http://www.japanesewords.net/1212/japanese-words-for-school/ Thu, 13 Dec 2012 02:46:05 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=1212 Study in Japan

Since I have started this website, I have gotten a lot of e-mails asking me about studying in Japan. For those of you who don’t know, I used to work as an admissions counselor to help bring students here to Japan. Something I will be doing again soon. For those of you who want to really learn Japanese, and especially for those who want to work in Japan, I would highly recommend studying in here.

There are possibilities to work in Japan for people who can’t speak Japanese fluently, or at least at a business level, but they are few. The primary two being recruiting and English teaching. If you really want to open up your options, then you need to learn Japanese fluently. One great way to do that is to study in Japan. Studying in Japan will help you both learn the culture and learn the Japanese language. Two things you will need to know to find a good job in Japan.

So, here is a list of Japanese words for those interested in studying in Japan. These words should help you ask questions about how your credits transfer, graduating, clubs, scholarships, student life, etc. Please feel free to add on more words in the comments.

  1. High school- 高校、こうこう
  2. Community College- 短大、たんだい
  3. College/University- 大学、だいがく
  4. Transcripts-  成績証明書、せいせきしょうめいしょ
  5. Credits- 単位、たんい
  6. Essay- エッセイ、
  7. Entrence essay-入学論文
  8. Entrance exam- 入学試験、にゅうがくしけん
  9. Scholarship- 奨学金、しょうがくきん
  10. transfer- 編入、へんにゅう
  11. Graduate- 卒業する、そつぎょうする
  12. Diploma- 卒業証明書
  13. Club-サークル
  14. Major, field- 専門、せんもん

This is a pretty short list that you can put into Anki and should be able to mostly remember in about a day. For those of you who aren’t using Anki, be sure to check it out. It’s a great tool and will help you learn faster. Also, as I mentioned earlier, be sure to add any additional words in the comments section.

]]>
Learn Japanese: How to Stay Motivated http://www.japanesewords.net/1205/learn-japanese-how-to-stay-motivated/ Fri, 30 Nov 2012 06:56:55 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=1205

I received an e-mail from a reader yesterday asking how I stayed motivated when I learned Japanese. Losing your motivation or feeling depressed by your lack of ability to speak Japanese is something that happens to many of us. My secret to staying with Japanese, even when I felt I wasn’t making progress, is really no secret at all. It’s very simple and something that can be applied to just about anything in life you decide to pursue.

Choose clear goals that you have a strong motivation to accomplish.

My original interest in Japanese came through my love of martial arts. My love of martial arts eventually lead to me studying a lot about budo, feudal Japan, samurai, and eventually Japanese.

There was no Japanese at my high school, but I enrolled into a class when I entered college. After one year, I could barely say “How are you?” Why? Because though I enjoyed Japanese, my interest in Japan and martial arts didn’t give me any clear goals. I couldn’t answer any solid questions: why I wanted to learn, when I would be able to speak, how much I should study everyday, how learning would help me, or a number of other important questions.

I was learning because it was interesting. It’s an okay reason, but it isn’t enough to keep you motivated when studying gets hard. I was thinking about giving up when I noticed that I couldn’t speak as well as I had hoped. I figured that Japanese was just too difficult.

After two years in college I had to choose a major. This was something that I wasn’t able to decide for two years and was causing me a lot of stress. After giving it a lot of thought, making lists of things that interested me, and considering my skills; I realized that I would study international business with an emphasis on Japan and a minor in Japanese.

Setting my goal helped me choose the path that I needed to achieve it

I had set me goal! After that it seemed like everything just fit into place. Setting my goal helped me choose the path that I needed to achieve it. Making just that one decision allowed me to immediately realize the following things:

  • I would focus on business classes (especially those pertaining to international business.
  • I must become fluent in Japanese.
  • I needed to put in more effort to learning Japanese
  • I needed to find a way to practice speaking with Japanese people
  • I need to spend at least a year studying in Japan.
  • I would work either in Japan or at least for a company who works with Japan.

So did I accomplish all of these things? I can proudly say “YES”. Was it always easy? NO. But I never felt like I would fail because I could see the finish line.

I declared my major as business with an international concentration, added a Japanese minor, and started studying more seriously in Japanese class. I also started taking advantage of the Japanese language tutoring lab to practice speaking. There were Japanese students available and I had never even thought to talk with them.

In addition, I started looking at study abroad courses and in the meantime took my first vacation to Japan. This motivated me even further and in my junior year I studied abroad at Waseda University and spent a year living  with a host family in Tokyo.

After I graduated, I moved back to Tokyo and worked as an admissions counselor to help other students from around the world come visit Japan.

I never would have gotten here if I didn’t have a solid goal and a very good reason for wanting to learn Japanese.

Here are some questions you can ask yourself regarding your Japanese study that should help you.

  • Why are you studying Japanese?
  • Why did you choose Japanese over other languages?
  • How well do you want to be able to speak?
  • When do you want to achieve this (what’s your deadline)?
  • How will being able to speak Japanese help your life?
  • When will you visit Japan?
  • Are you planning to live or study in Japan?

I would love to hear your answers to these questions. Please let us know your reasons in the comments section.

 

]]>
Remembering the Kanji in 58 Days (Day 25) http://www.japanesewords.net/1202/remembering-the-kanji-in-58-days-day-25/ Wed, 28 Nov 2012 05:55:40 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=1202 It has been a few days since my last update, but I wanted to let everyone know that I am still studying kanji everyday. There are a few days that I wasn’t able to study (attending a friend’s wedding, busy work days), but for the most part I have stayed on track.

As of yesterday I was up to 835 Kanji and will finish today at about 870. That puts me very close to my target of completing the entire Remembering the Kanji book in 58 days.

I also have a few tips for using this book to study Japanese.

  • The stories are important. So when you get to the part where you have to make up your own, make sure you create a very visual story and don’t just skip though the meanings.
  • Focus when you are learning the stories. If your attention is divided you most likely won’t remember the kanji later.
  • Pay attention to the kanji when you are learning Japanese words for your normal study. The more reinforcement you have of seeing the kanji the better.
  • Don’t get overwhelmed. If you feel like you are going too fast and it’s too much, slow down.
  • Use the Glossary in the back or a kanji poster to mark off and see your progress. It will also give you one more chance at recognition.
  • Lastly, set your goal. It may seem like you will never finish, but if you have a goal, it is much easier to move forward.

頑張りましょう!

If you are following along and study the kanji as well, please post a comment talking about your experience.

]]>
Remembering the Kanji in 58 days:Day 5 http://www.japanesewords.net/1189/remembering-the-kanji-in-58-daysday-5/ Thu, 08 Nov 2012 12:45:13 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=1189 20121108-214307.jpg

Highlighted have been learned

 

I finished my 5th day today and am currently at 299 kanji. I had about 50 reviews plus the new cards I studied today. All together it still took me about an hour. Finding and marking the kanji off the kanji poster took far more time. However, I have to say that the kanji poster has been very helpful. It has forced me to recognize the kanji to make sure I know meaning.

Now that the kanji are starting to pile up a little, it is more important than ever to focus on the stories and really imagine them. I studied in the car today while waiting for my wife in the store. It was easy to get distracted and I realized later that I didn’t remember those kanji as well. Make sure you seclude yourself and really focus. Don’t try to go too fast.

In case you missed the start of this program you can read about how to do it yourself here: Learning 2042 Kanji in just 58 Days

]]>
Remembering the Kanji in 58 Days (Day 4) http://www.japanesewords.net/1185/remembering-the-kanji-in-58-days-day-4/ Wed, 07 Nov 2012 15:46:42 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=1185 This is just a mini-update to let you know that I am still on track for Remembering the Kanji. I have been doing it for a total of 4 days now and am up to 234 kanji. In order to finish in time I need to continue to study at least 33 kanji per day. I am planning to continue at about 50 or so a day for at least the next couple of days, so that number should go down. At this point retention is still very good and I am not having any trouble with this many each day. I spent about 1 hour total today.

For those having trouble remembering the kanji after you’ve learned it, don’t focus on the writing. Instead, spend more time visualizing the story. It will make writing it much easier.

Also, be sure to check out the latest post I made about exporting lists into Anki. A tip to help you study more Japanese words faster:  Using Imiwa’s Export Function to Get More Japanese Words

Does learning the kanji sound like fun to you? You can find what you will need to do the same thing here: Remembering 2042 Kanji in 58 Days

]]>
Remembering the Kanji in 58 Days (Day 3) http://www.japanesewords.net/1179/remembering-the-kanji-in-58-days-day-3/ Tue, 06 Nov 2012 05:51:19 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=1179

Highlighted kanji have been learned.

I just finished with day 3 and am up to 172 Kanji with a very high retaining rate. I also have them all reviewed in Anki and highlighted on the Kanji Poster.

I am a bit ahead of schedule, but I am doing it on purpose. I figure I will study as many as I can in these early stages while it is fun and exciting. That way I won’t have as big of a workload as the reviews get longer.

Today I studied about 70 Kanji in about 30 minutes and then reviewed 74 cards in 11 minutes with Anki. All together less than one hour.

I look forward to your comments and hearing about your own progress.

I should mention that studying the kanji won’t teach you any Japanese words or grammar along the way. It will however, teach you the basic meanings of the kanji and how to recognize and write them.

 

]]>
Learning 2042 Kanji in just 58 Days http://www.japanesewords.net/1172/learning-2042-kanji-in-just-58-days/ http://www.japanesewords.net/1172/learning-2042-kanji-in-just-58-days/#comments Mon, 05 Nov 2012 07:30:07 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=1172

Is it possible? Many of you are probably thinking no! However, there are others who have done it. I won’t be the first. I should point out that I wouldn’t recommend this method for everyone. I have a lot of experience with kanji, I studied Japanese in the US, attended Waseda University in Tokyo, and currently live in Japan. Unfortunately, I haven’t taken the time to learn all 2042 kanji and make sure that I can recall and write them whenever I want.

I’ve decided that NOW is that time!

I calculated that to reach my goal of 2042 kanji in 58 57 days that I need to study at least 36 kanji per day. I actually started yesterday, and studied 52 yesterday and 52 today. So two days and I am now at 104 Kanji. For the first couple hundred I will probable keep this pace to give myself a little leeway at the end.

So what better time than to learn the kanji than to study along with me!

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Remembering the Kanji 1: I did a full review on this book and was really impressed with the method it uses to teach kanji. You can get it here. (Purchasing using this link helps support this site.
  • Anki: We will be using this to review the kanji and make sure we are remembering them correctly. The full set of RTK cards can be downloaded from their site.
  • Reviewing the Kanji: I recommend an account here so that you can check out different stories for help (This will make more sense to you once you start). The downloadable card set in Anki already contains the links.
  • Kanji Poster: Recommended if you want to see the kanji all in one place. Cool to have, but not really necessary to reach our goal. (Link also helps support this site).
How to Study Kanji for this project
  1. Choose your finish date, and then divide the number of kanji by the number of days you have left. In my case 2042 kanji/58 days=36 kanji per day.
  2. Study the Kanji using the Remembering the Kanji book.
  3. Review the kanji you have learned in Anki. I usually wait at least a couple of hours before reviewing.
  4. Mark off or highlight kanji you know on the kanji poster (not necessary, but will help give me a visual of my progress)
  5. Rinse and repeat, until you have conquered all the kanji.
  6. Make sure you continue to study Anki and also use your learned kanji to read Japanese.
So, in order to stay motivated, lets do it together! I will be posting about my progress, and please feel free to leave comments or questions about yours.

頑張りましょう!

 

 

]]>
http://www.japanesewords.net/1172/learning-2042-kanji-in-just-58-days/feed/ 8
Learn Japanese: Japanese Restaurant http://www.japanesewords.net/1155/learn-japanese-japanese-restaurant/ Sun, 27 May 2012 04:23:13 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=1155 I mentioned that I would make some learn Japanese videos and here is the first one. There was a ton of video, but I tried to edit it down to make it simple and short. Most of the Japanese words are pretty simple ones, and some are repeated several times. I have a ton more video, so there will be more on the way! Please leave comments and feedback, and please subscribe to my Youtube Channel. I have some free gifts to give out once the channel reaches a certain number of subscribers.

]]>