Comments on: 10 Common Japanese Idiomatic Phrases http://www.japanesewords.net/494/10-common-japanese-proverbs/ From Japanese Words to Japanese Fluency Mon, 07 Jan 2013 10:05:20 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.10 By: Dennis Miller http://www.japanesewords.net/494/10-common-japanese-proverbs/comment-page-1/#comment-27446 Wed, 21 Dec 2011 01:55:44 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=494#comment-27446 I’m a reference librarian trying to answer a patron’s request. He’s wanting to know how in Japanese it may be said: “many paths to travel” or something very similar. Thank you.

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By: Nick http://www.japanesewords.net/494/10-common-japanese-proverbs/comment-page-1/#comment-5014 Mon, 22 Nov 2010 05:48:47 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=494#comment-5014 Daniel, I am glad that you found them helpful. BTW, what company do you work for?

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By: Daniel http://www.japanesewords.net/494/10-common-japanese-proverbs/comment-page-1/#comment-4699 Fri, 12 Nov 2010 13:46:08 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=494#comment-4699 Thank you, Eri, for this article, and thanks to Libby for the correction. Working in a Japanese company I inadvertently used a few of these 慣用句 without being aware of it! But, most of these are new to me and should be very useful.

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By: Eri http://www.japanesewords.net/494/10-common-japanese-proverbs/comment-page-1/#comment-102 Fri, 14 Aug 2009 09:39:36 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=494#comment-102 Thank you Libby.
You are right. These are not Kotowaza, but Kanyouku. I’ve change the title.

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By: Libby http://www.japanesewords.net/494/10-common-japanese-proverbs/comment-page-1/#comment-101 Thu, 13 Aug 2009 03:13:32 +0000 http://www.japanesewords.net/?p=494#comment-101 Actually, these are not ことわざ (kotowaza) but in fact 慣用句 (kanyouku), as they are idiomatic expressions rather than proverbs, and as such can be used in a variety of ways (e.g. I was very angry, he might be very angry, etc.). Kotowaza, on the other hand, like proverbs in English, are set phrases. Examples of kotowaza would be 『猿も木から落ちる』, “even monkeys fall from trees,” meaning that even skilled people make mistakes, and 「苦しい時の神頼み」, “praying to God in difficult times,” the Japanese equivalent of “there are no atheists in foxholes.” Since kanyouku are often used, they are important to learn; kotowaza are not quite as commonly seen but can add a lot of variety to your conversation. Knowing the difference between the two is also important.

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